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This is a weapon the mound uilders develuped to hunt fish & deffend against other villages toprevent slaves sloter and sacrifice so this is there survival tool
This is a weapon the mound uilders develuped to hunt fish & deffend against other villages toprevent slaves sloter and sacrifice so this is there survival tool

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Human Stirrup Bottle.
H: 10"
Mississippi Co., MO.
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this was a tole this arrow head was used for carving & digging but it is also used to help the mound builders or anasazi kill there hunt or in this case hunt for food among forests neer there mound sites

this was a tole this arrow head was used for carving & digging but it is also used to help the mound builders or anasazi kill there hunt or in this case hunt for food among forests neer there mound sites



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this sharper form of arrow head is probebly nown to help the mound builders hunt fish most common used for weapondry to deffend against other villages that plan to thief make them slaves and sacrifice the mound builders for there religis god thats why mound people use these

this sharper form of arrow head is probebly nown to help the mound builders hunt fish most common used for weapondry to deffend against other villages that plan to thief make them slaves and sacrifice the mound builders for there religis god thats why mound people use these

Mound Builders

The Mississippian, Quapaw and Caddo moundbuilders produced the finest pottery of prehistoric North America. Although pottery began appearing in North America a thousand years before the Mississippians, this pre-Mississippian pottery tended to be utilitarian bowls with limited ornamentation. By contrast, the Mississippians produced pottery of great durability and high artistic merit

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The moundbuilders ruled a ton of land in the seven and ninth century A.D.

The moundbuilders ruled a ton of land in the seven and ninth century A.D.


Mississippian Artifacts

Mound Builders in North American archaeology, name given to those people who built mounds in a large area from the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico and from the Mississippi River to the Appalachian Mts. The greatest concentrations of mounds are found in the Mississippi and Ohio valleys. The term "Mound Builders" arose when the origin of the monuments was considered mysterious, most European Americans assuming that the Native Americans were too uncivilized for this accomplishment. In 1894, Cyrus Thompson of the Smithsonian Institution concluded that the Mound Builders were in fact the Native Americans. Clarence Moore, who excavated numerous mound sites in the South between 1892-1916, believed the southern Mound Builders were heavily influenced by the Mesoamerican civilizations, an idea now generally discounted.
Mound Builders in North American archaeology, name given to those people who built mounds in a large area from the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico and from the Mississippi River to the Appalachian Mts. The greatest concentrations of mounds are found in the Mississippi and Ohio valleys. The term "Mound Builders" arose when the origin of the monuments was considered mysterious, most European Americans assuming that the Native Americans were too uncivilized for this accomplishment. In 1894, Cyrus Thompson of the Smithsonian Institution concluded that the Mound Builders were in fact the Native Americans. Clarence Moore, who excavated numerous mound sites in the South between 1892-1916, believed the southern Mound Builders were heavily influenced by the Mesoamerican civilizations, an idea now generally discounted. http://www.amazon.com/review/product/0595661815?filterBy=addFiveStar

The Mound Builders

An Eastern Woodland Indian Tradition

The Mound Builders is a term used to describe several First Nation's cultures that built earthen burial mounds and other earthworks across a large area of North America that extended from the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico and from the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers to the Appalachian mountains. The Mound culture emerged at about 3000 BC and disappeared around 1200 AD.
The term 'mound builders' doesn't refer to any one specific culture, but rather encompasses several cultures that spanned the 4000+ year period and ranged from mobile hunter-gatherers to sedentary farmers.
The earliest mounds were built approximately 4000 years ago (The Archaic Period) at a place now known as Monroe, Louisiana. The site consists of eleven mounds. The Archaic mound-building tradition continued in that general region until approximately 500 BC. A site known as Poverty Point, in West Carroll Parish, Louisiana,includes two large mounds, one of which reaches 65 ft (20 m) high. Each of those mounds is surrounded by six concentric earth ridges.
The Archaic culture morphed into the Early Woodlands culture but the mound builders traditions continued with the evolution of the Adena Mound Building culture (circa 1000BC - 300BC) and then the emergence of the magnificent Hopewell mound builders (circa 300BC - 700AD).

http://asms.k12.ar.us/armem/hopper/Builders.htm
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Painting representing a ritual cerimony taking place in a plaza.
(Lousiana Division of Archeology)

During the later period of the Mississippian, culture about 1250-1550, warfare began to increase between the Mississippian societies. This was probably because of competetion over farmland, which was becoming less abundant duc to the growing populations. Skeletons with imbedded arrowheads have been uncovered at many mound sites. The Mississippian Indians had bows and arrows which could pierce through the chain mail armor of the Spanish conquistadors. There are numerous portrayals of scalping and beheading as well as severed trophy heads in Mississippian artwork. In the mid 1500's, when the Spanish conquistadors arrived in the Southeast, the the Mid-South region was largely abandoned. It was formerly believed that the desertion of the Mississippian centers had been the result of a population loss due to the introduction of European diseases. However, radiocarbon dating has shown that the decline in population began more than a century before Europeans arrived in the region. The decline of the Mississippian Indians' population is still a mystery.

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This hoe was one of the Mississippian Indians most important uarding tools. It has a smooth polish from long
use in sandy soil. (University of Arkansas Website)


The Mississippians' villages were built in a fairly standard pattern. Ceremonial buildings on large four sided flat-topped mounds faced a plaza. The villagers gathered in the plaza for important events and ceremonies. Archeologists do not know exactly what purpose these buildings fulfilled. The most widely accepted ideas are that they were either religious structures, or the homes of chiefs or other important families. They would have functioned as temple and town hall where religious ceremonies and political meetings were held. As the Mississippians flourished, the mounds evolvedhttp://asms.k12.ar.us/armem/hopper/Builders.htm into large urban centers. Sometimes one large flat-topped mound dominated a village or ceremonial center. More often, several mounds were arranged around a rectangular plaza, with the village at its edges. The mounds were built over a period of years. They may have began as a slight rise with an important building on it. After a time, perhaps its grass roof caught fire or the people burned it down as part of a cleansing ceremony. Whatever the cause, the builders brought basketful after basketful of dirt to start a new foundation. Many Mississippians, each hauling 60-pound baskets of soil, worked to complete each stage. When it was ready, they built a new building on top. This process was repeated many times to the same mound, and each time it would grow larger. Crews of workers labored over generations, sometimes a century or more, before an earthwork reached its final dimensions.

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Drilled Southern Spatulate
H: 5.5"
Tennessee greenstone.
Hamilton Co., TN.

http://www.mississippian-artifacts.com/

By reason of infectious Old World diseases brought by the Spanish, population migration due to the depletion of natural resources, or for other unknown reasons Mississippian Moundbuilders vanished before Marquette and Joliet traveled through the old Mississippian lands in the late 17th century. However, we still have tangible reminders of this once powerful and highly developed culture. The Moundbuilders were highly accomplished potters, flint knappers and stone workers who also designed and created many status ornaments such as shell gorgets, ear ornaments and beads. This website displays some of the finest Mississippian, Quapaw and Caddo artifacts in private and public hands.

By definition, a prehistoric people, such as the Mississippian Moundbuilders, left behind no written record of their history. We do have their artifacts and great earthen mounds to help tell their stories and suggest their past. The artifacts displayed here are some of the finest ever recovered. Many reflect the high water mark of their makers' achievements. No other website exhibits the fantastic Moundbuilder artifacts to such a representative and comprehensive extent. Take your time and enjoy these great reminders of our distant native past. It is a story worth sharing.

Finally, I would like to share my thoughts and objectives about this website. It is my intention that this virtual exhibit serve as a celebration of Mississippian art and culture. This is and shall remain a non-commercial venture. I am not a professional archaeologist and I do not pretend to be one. However, I have made a very conscious effort to travel throughout the Country in search of the best Mississippian artifacts to display in this site. It is a reality of life that many interested professionals and students of Mississippian art and archaeology may never have an opportunity to personally examine the many fine artifacts that I have had the pleasure to examine, study and photograph. The remarkable qualities of web technology can now provide the viewer with the next best means of seeing these great artistic creations. I must further acknowledge that although I am solely responsible for the final content of this site, my work would not be complete without the selfless and friendly support of many experienced and seasoned students of Mississippian archaeology. I wish to specifically thank the following individuals for allowing me to visit them and their collections, talk with them about each artifact and allow me to exhibit the photographs contained in this site: Gordon Hart, Roy Hathcock, Mike Dominy, Kent Patterson, Floyd Ritter, Steve Puttera, Jr., Ron Smith, Dan Swan of the Gilcrease Museum, Tommy Bryden, David Perky, Dr. Kent Westbrook, Jim Frederick, Ray Fraser and the many others who have unselfishly contributed to this site but who wish to remain anonymous. A special thanks to my web designer, Doug Gundersen of Lenexa, Kansas, who has done a masterful job in helping me create this site. To all of you, I say, "thank you".


Detail from a painting of a large Mississipian mound.
Detail from a painting of a large Mississipian mound.

Detail from a painting of a large Mississipian mound.

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Ancient Architects of the Mississippi
Ancient Architects of the Mississippi

Ancient Architects of the Mississippi

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WONDERS OF GEOMETRIC PRECISION, the earthworks of the lower Mississippi were centers of life long before the Europeans arrived in America. As was the river itself. The alluvial soil of its banks yielded a bounty of beans, squash, and corn to foster burgeoning communities. Over the Mississippi’s waters, from near and far, came prized pearls, copper, and micahttp://www.nps.gov/archeology/feature/feature.htm

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(image)  Detail looking down a long, central avenue of homes toward a large central mound.
(image) Detail looking down a long, central avenue of homes toward a large central mound.
|| || (image) Detail looking down a long, central avenue of homes toward a large central mound. || http://www.nps.gov/history/archeology/FEATURE/builder.htm

Mound builders are very skilled people. They build lots of awesome buildings. In this picture the Mound Builders are working on something. They can make anything.


VOCAB
artifacts- an object left behind by people who lived long ago
Renaissance- the humanistic revival of classical art literature and learning in Europe
drought- a long period of time with no rain
dominate- to control, govern or rule by superior power or strength; be dominant in position or authority
irrigation- a method of supplying dry land with water through a series of ditches or pipes
Emerald- a bright-green transparent form of beryl that is use as a gem; dark yellowish green
plaza- a public square or similar open area in town or city
archaeologist-a person who practices archaeology
archaeology- the scientific study of the remains of past human activities, such as burials, tools, and
flourish- to grow well or luxuriantly; thrive; to fair well; succeed; prosper.
ceremonial- of a ceremony; ceremony; the formal rules of ceremony observed in social life, religion worship, etc.:
palisade-a fence of sticks forming a fortification; a line of high cliffs usually around a river
erect- directed or pointing upward; vertical ;to build; put up; construct



This what the Mound bilders wear. They wear moccasins

that you can wear in the summer. They do not wear much clothes.

Everyone has long hair even men. They wear feathers in their hair. They

wear lots of jewely even men. That is all I know they wear.


MOUND BUILDERS
The mound builders did not where much clothing but over their front and back
they wore cloth they always where cool beads, and earrings. They also have mostly long
hair. Sometimes they wore feathers on there head hooked to bands to go on there
heads it was the style back then.I think.the shoes that they where was sandals type things
and they wore moccasins.there cloths are weird and they have intelligent outfits.